json
JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) è un formato per l'interscambio di dati client/server, più flessibile di XML, sempre più usato in AJAX e nel web 2.0
Indice
Ricevere dati JSON via Ajax
Ci sono tre modi diversi di ricevere i dati di JSON con AJAX: l'assegnazione, chiamata ripetuta (callback) ed analisi (parse).

JSON tramite Assegnazione

Non c'è un nome standard per questi metodi, comunque il metodo di assegnazione è un buon nome descrittivo perché il file restituito dal server genera un'espressione di Javascript che assegnerà l'oggetto di JSON ad una variabile. Quando il responseText dal server è passato con eval, someVar sarà caricato con l'oggetto di JSON e potete accedervi direttamente.
var JSONFile = "miaVar = { 'colore' : 'blu' }";  // esempio di 
// quanto ricevuto dal server.
eval(JSONFile); // Eseguite il codice javascript contenuto in JSONFile.

document.writeln(miaVar.colore); // restituisce 'blu' 

JSON tramite Callback (chiamata ripetuta)

Il secondo metodo chiama una funzione predefinita e passa i dati di JSON a quella funzione come primo argomento. Una buona definizione per questo metodo è metodo di chiamata ripetuta (callback). Questo metodo è ampiamente usato quando si interagisce con files JSON di terze parti (per es. dati JSON da domini controllati da altri).
function elaboraDati(oggettoJson) {
   document.writeln(oggettoJson.colore); // restituisce "blu"
}

// esempio di quanto ricevuto dal server...
var JSONFile = "elaboraDati( { 'colore' : 'blu' } )";

eval(JSONFile);

JSON tramite Parse (analisi)

Il terzo e ultimo metodo invia un oggetto grezzo che deve essere analizzato da una funzione. Possiamo definirlo metodo di analisi (parse). Questo metodo è, di gran lunga, il più sicuro per trasferire i dati e di JSON sarà incluso nella prossima versione di Javascript che sarà rilasciata nel 2008. Per ora, purtroppo, è limitato soltanto ai domini che controllate.
// Il seguente blocco implementa il metodo string.parseJSON 
// Prototipo rilasciato in Pubblico Dominio, aggiornato il 2007-04-13
// Autore Originale: Douglas Crockford
// Sito Originale  : http://www.json.org
// URL Originale   : http://www.json.org/json.js
/*
    json.js
    2007-04-13

    Public Domain

    This file adds these methods to JavaScript:

        array.toJSONString()
        boolean.toJSONString()
        date.toJSONString()
        number.toJSONString()
        object.toJSONString()
        string.toJSONString()
            These methods produce a JSON text from a JavaScript value.
            It must not contain any cyclical references. Illegal values
            will be excluded.

            The default conversion for dates is to an ISO string. You can
            add a toJSONString method to any date object to get a different
            representation.

        string.parseJSON(filter)
            This method parses a JSON text to produce an object or
            array. It can throw a SyntaxError exception.

            The optional filter parameter is a function which can filter and
            transform the results. It receives each of the keys and values, and
            its return value is used instead of the original value. If it
            returns what it received, then structure is not modified. If it
            returns undefined then the member is deleted.

            Example:

            // Parse the text. If a key contains the string 'date' then
            // convert the value to a date.

            myData = text.parseJSON(function (key, value) {
                return key.indexOf('date') >= 0 ? new Date(value) : value;
            });

    It is expected that these methods will formally become part of the
    JavaScript Programming Language in the Fourth Edition of the
    ECMAScript standard in 2008.

    This file will break programs with improper for..in loops. See
    http://yuiblog.com/blog/2006/09/26/for-in-intrigue/

    This is a reference implementation. You are free to copy, modify, or
    redistribute.

    Use your own copy. It is extremely unwise to load untrusted third party
    code into your pages.
*/

// Augment the basic prototypes if they have not already been augmented.

if (!Object.prototype.toJSONString) {

    Array.prototype.toJSONString = function () {
        var a = ['['],  // The array holding the text fragments.
            b,          // A boolean indicating that a comma is required.
            i,          // Loop counter.
            l = this.length,
            v;          // The value to be stringified.

        function p(s) {

// p accumulates text fragments in an array. It inserts a comma before all
// except the first fragment.

            if (b) {
                a.push(',');
            }
            a.push(s);
            b = true;
        }

// For each value in this array...

        for (i = 0; i < l; i += 1) {
            v = this[i];
            switch (typeof v) {

// Serialize a JavaScript object value. Ignore objects thats lack the
// toJSONString method. Due to a specification error in ECMAScript,
// typeof null is 'object', so watch out for that case.

            case 'object':
                if (v) {
                    if (typeof v.toJSONString === 'function') {
                        p(v.toJSONString());
                    }
                } else {
                    p("null");
                }
                break;

// Otherwise, serialize the value.

            case 'string':
            case 'number':
            case 'boolean':
                p(v.toJSONString());

// Values without a JSON representation are ignored.

            }
        }

// Join all of the fragments together and return.

        a.push(']');
        return a.join('');
    };


    Boolean.prototype.toJSONString = function () {
        return String(this);
    };


    Date.prototype.toJSONString = function () {

// Ultimately, this method will be equivalent to the date.toISOString method.

        function f(n) {

// Format integers to have at least two digits.

            return n < 10 ? '0' + n : n;
        }

        return '"' + this.getFullYear() + '-' +
                f(this.getMonth() + 1) + '-' +
                f(this.getDate()) + 'T' +
                f(this.getHours()) + ':' +
                f(this.getMinutes()) + ':' +
                f(this.getSeconds()) + '"';
    };


    Number.prototype.toJSONString = function () {

// JSON numbers must be finite. Encode non-finite numbers as null.

        return isFinite(this) ? String(this) : "null";
    };


    Object.prototype.toJSONString = function () {
        var a = ['{'],  // The array holding the text fragments.
            b,          // A boolean indicating that a comma is required.
            k,          // The current key.
            v;          // The current value.

        function p(s) {

// p accumulates text fragment pairs in an array. It inserts a comma before all
// except the first fragment pair.

            if (b) {
                a.push(',');
            }
            a.push(k.toJSONString(), ':', s);
            b = true;
        }

// Iterate through all of the keys in the object, ignoring the proto chain.

        for (k in this) {
            if (this.hasOwnProperty(k)) {
                v = this[k];
                switch (typeof v) {

// Serialize a JavaScript object value. Ignore objects that lack the
// toJSONString method. Due to a specification error in ECMAScript,
// typeof null is 'object', so watch out for that case.

                case 'object':
                    if (v) {
                        if (typeof v.toJSONString === 'function') {
                            p(v.toJSONString());
                        }
                    } else {
                        p("null");
                    }
                    break;

                case 'string':
                case 'number':
                case 'boolean':
                    p(v.toJSONString());

// Values without a JSON representation are ignored.

                }
            }
        }

// Join all of the fragments together and return.

        a.push('}');
        return a.join('');
    };


    (function (s) {

// Augment String.prototype. We do this in an immediate anonymous function to
// avoid defining global variables.

// m is a table of character substitutions.

        var m = {
            '\b': '\\b',
            '\t': '\\t',
            '\n': '\\n',
            '\f': '\\f',
            '\r': '\\r',
            '"' : '\\"',
            '\\': '\\\\'
        };


        s.parseJSON = function (filter) {

// Parsing happens in three stages. In the first stage, we run the text against
// a regular expression which looks for non-JSON characters. We are especially
// concerned with '()' and 'new' because they can cause invocation, and '='
// because it can cause mutation. But just to be safe, we will reject all
// unexpected characters.

            var j;

            function walk(k, v) {
                var i;
                if (v && typeof v === 'object') {
                    for (i in v) {
                        if (v.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
                            v[i] = walk(i, v[i]);
                        }
                    }
                }
                return filter(k, v);
            }

            try {
          if (/^("(\\.|[^"\\\n\r])*?"|[,:{}\[\]0-9.\-+Eaeflnr-u \n\r\t])+?$/.
                        test(this)) {

// In the second stage we use the eval function to compile the text into a
// JavaScript structure. The '{' operator is subject to a syntactic ambiguity
// in JavaScript: it can begin a block or an object literal. We wrap the text
// in parens to eliminate the ambiguity.

                    j = eval('(' + this + ')');

// In the optional third stage, we recursively walk the new structure, passing
// each name/value pair to a filter function for possible transformation.

                    if (typeof filter === 'function') {
                        j = walk('', j);
                    }
                    return j;
                }
            } catch (e) {

// Fall through if the regexp test fails.

            }
            throw new SyntaxError("parseJSON");
        };


        s.toJSONString = function () {

// If the string contains no control characters, no quote characters, and no
// backslash characters, then we can simply slap some quotes around it.
// Otherwise we must also replace the offending characters with safe
// sequences.

            if (/["\\\x00-\x1f]/.test(this)) {
                return '"' + this.replace(/([\x00-\x1f\\"])/g, function (a, b) {
                    var c = m[b];
                    if (c) {
                        return c;
                    }
                    c = b.charCodeAt();
                    return '\\u00' +
                        Math.floor(c / 16).toString(16) +
                        (c % 16).toString(16);
                }) + '"';
            }
            return '"' + this + '"';
        };
    })(String.prototype);
}
// fine del codice tratto da: http://www.json.org/json.js

// inizio del codice dell'esempio (sempre di pubblico dominio)
DatiJson = '{"colore" : "verde"}'; // Esempio di quanto ricevuto dal server.
mioOggetto=DatiJson.parseJSON();   
document.writeln(mioOggetto.colore); // restituisce: "verde".
Come potete vedere, dovrete includere il prototipo di pubblico dominio che analizzerà i dati di JSON, tuttavia una volta incluso, elaborare i dati di JSON è semplice come potete osservare nelle ultime tre linee del suddetto esempio. Dei tre metodi di estrazione, il metodo di Parse è il più sicuro ed espone il vostro codice ai pochi problemi. E' consigliabile usare questo metodo ove possibile in tutte le vostre richieste di JSON via AJAX.
json.it by WebGuide
W3C XHTML - W3C CSS